Breeds and their primary discipline

Discussion in 'The Corral' started by MyTeDun, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    There is a multitude of breeds of horses while only maybe a dozen or so are popular here in the states.

    I have a question?----- ???
    What discipline of riding is primary to each breed and why that one?

    Hardiness (ease of care in certain regions)?-----

    Your breed and discipline?-----
     
  2. Brilliance

    Brilliance New Member

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    I will admit it . . .I could care less about the other breeds I love my QH's!!!

    AQHA & IBHA=HUS HAL WP
     

  3. snaffle

    snaffle Guest

    I like

    calm
    sensible
    pokey

    and they must love me.

    my quarter horses fall under those requirements.

    Twisted wire has a couple paints that fall under those requirements..
    plus a aqha

    the arab we used to own..
    wasnt calm
    didnt share my thoughts on sensible
    he was only pokey when I rode him

    and he loved me unconditionally

    our mini is:
    calm
    sensible
    pokey

    and he loves me.. (I think)
     
  4. lowrider

    lowrider Guest

    I have Arab's and Half Arabs. They show Western, Western Sidesaddle , and Halter. My daughters mare is a Hunter, and will be a Sidesaddle horse as well as halter.


    P.S. Mine are calm and very laid back.
     
  5. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    This is a pretty big question that probably deserves a much bigger answer. However, I'll try to shoot something out there as brief as possible and hope it makes sense.

    Certain breeds have been purposely bred for certain disciplines and it has created physical characteristics, temperments, and movement/atheletic abilities which match well with the breeds intended use. Think QH's for western events, TBs for racing, Saddlebreds for park pleasure, WBs for dressage, and so on. Breaking it down even further you have smaller variations between different types -- for instance the Belgian WBs have emphasized jumping, the Swedish horses come from a national breeding program which has emphasized dressage which causes differences between the two even though they are both WBs, and they will look, behave, move more in keeping with those emphasis. Breaking it down even further there are strains/bloodlines within all horse/pony breeds which, due to their particular physical type, temperment, movement/atheletic ability have become "specialists" within a narrow range of events and the continued crossing of similar individuals has made them differ from others within their own breed (very few horses are purpose bred for versatility in many disciplines anymore -- although you do still find some individuals).

    As for what someone wants to do with a horse -- go with the horse that's bred for the job; realizing there are individuals within any breed that break the mold and do quite well in nontraditional events for their breed (TB wp pleasure horses or QH dressage stars).

    Most importantly the horse should match the rider tempermentaly and ability wise, and there again certain bloodlines do better (usually) for different types of riders; for instance some lines are known as professionals horses, some lines have reputations as amateur/youth horses. This is perhaps the most important thing as most riders are not pros (or even professional amateurs), need a nice, sound, cheerful horse of medium atheletic ability, with great patience, work ethic, and versatility (most folks like to dabble in different events) -- such a horse doesn't sound too exciting, and many breeding programs have (regrettably) gotten away from this in pursuing more specialization and show ring success at the upper levels, but this type of horse is the 'bread and butter' of the horse industry and good ones are worth gold as they are very rare.
     
  6. sandburs

    sandburs New Member

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    Very well stated jenm. No matter what the breed or discipline the best horse is the one that fits you the most, and does what you want your horse to do. If looking for a horse definitely do not be afraid to look "outside the breed box" for your discipline and don't overlook the versatility horse who may not be #1 in each thing, but does everything very well none the less.
     
  7. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Oh how true!
    I am starting to think outside of the box since my back has deteriorated to the point of pain. My days of riding QH, the bouncey ones the young ones that simply move too much is coming to an end. I'm starting to look at the fox trotters as my next horse. The gaited horses are such a relief to the back sooooo within the next few years thats the road I'm going to take.

    What other breeds are gaited?

    I know of tennessee walkers and the paso but thats about it.
     
  8. Susan

    Susan New Member

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    There are the Mountain Horses (Kentucky Mountain, Spotted Mountain, Rocky Mountain and Mountain Pleasure come to mind), Tennessee Walking horses, Paso fino horses, Fox Trotters, Spotted Saddle horses and Icelandics (they do the "Tolt"). Some Morgan horses can do a rack. With in the gainted breeds are differences in gait. Some Fox trotters can fox trot and do a nice running walk, Tenn. Walking horses can rack, pace and/or running walk (my daughter's gelding does a stepping pace while my spotted TWH does a nice running walk-I'mnot comfortabel on her horse and she isn't comfortable on mine ;)). The Mountain horses do a saddle rack. Some gaits are more comfortable than others and different folks like different gaits. I was a lot of help huh? Ride as many as you can to determine which gait you like best, then look for that gait in the horse you want. Mountain Horses are not easily found here in IL. I think there is a breeder in Wisconsin. They are quite pricey as are the Paso Finos.
     
  9. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Wow Susan you definitely know your gaited horses.

    Where would I start? Ok here is another prerequisite for me----- shorter breed max. 15h
    Currently I have to use something just to get up in the saddle, my back and leg refuses to allow me to get my foot up into the stirrup (15.3h horse)

    My dismount is gorgeous, I basically fall once I swing my right leg over. Need a shorter drop
     
  10. Susan

    Susan New Member

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    I hear ya on short! When I bought Cheyenne, he was 14.2 and 4 yrs old and was a tad tall for me then. Well, he grew a little and now at 14.3 after a trim, I have to use my little Giddyup stool to get on out on the trail unless I have a log or picinc bench. Delight was perfect for me at 14.1. The Mountain horses average around 14.2 and the Icelandics are small as well. All of the gaited breeds have short and tall, so I feel that looking for the gait and personality that is right for me outweighs the breed choice somewhat. I have never had the opportunity to ride a Mountain horse, but I would love to try one as that rack looks really smooth to ride and they are supposes to be a breed that takes care of its rider and is very surefooted on the trail. I forgot to mention the gaited mules! How could I forget them???? My ferrier sells gaited mules and horses. His wife and step daughter show foxtrotters and they train them as well as the mules and anything else that comes on the place. He almost always has something gaited to sell. Dave trail rides and ropes/team pens (has a nice roping mule that does well in WP too). I bought my gaited horses from him and have been very happy with them. They were just what he said they would be.
     
  11. Joie

    Joie New Member

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    I know of TWO breeders here in NW Illinois with very nice Rockies. Reasonably priced, AND well-bred and started well from the very beginning.

    Feel free to PM me if you'd like contact info.
     
  12. morapt

    morapt New Member

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    There is actually a group within the morgan breed that are breeding and promoting the morgan gaited lines. Very pretty and typy morgans with the smoothness of the gaited breeds. (not that I'm not partial or anything :D)
     
  13. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Morapt my very first horse was a morgan mare. I adored that horse!! Her registered name was: Tillicum Carrie Ash--- Lippett bloodlines. She looked more like a belgain then a morgan. Heavily built chestnut with flaxen mane and tail. God I loved that horse. Would love to find another like her but shorter--she was 15.1
     
  14. morapt

    morapt New Member

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    Hmmm, I could do some checking if your really looking. I wouldn't mind helping someone else spend their money ;D
     
  15. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Oh not right now! I'm into WP with my qh.

    It will be a few years before I move on to something else. BUT you can definitely point me in the right direction, I love looking
     
  16. HALL FARMS

    HALL FARMS Insert Title Here

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    A friend of mine breeds gaited morgans down here in So. IL. They have some beautiful horses.
     
  17. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    The morgans are a graceful and elegant breed---- I love them and will one day have another one but want the old fashion bloodlines
     
  18. photofinish

    photofinish Senior Member

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    I always thought the foxtrotters I was around were like gaited QHs, cutting bred QHs..They are just too short for me, bummer.

    I'm gonna get my 1/4belgian, 1/4QH, 1/2zebra zorse......I'll report back if it is good for anything. Hopefully it'll be a cool pony horse, else it'll be in BUC's avatar....