Dropped Pasterns

Discussion in 'Ask The (wannabe) Vets & Farriers' started by MyTeDun, Oct 14, 2008.

  1. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    My old guy, Rocky, has gotten up there in age. He is 31 and I retired him about 3 yrs ago when his pasterns started to drop. Now I've seen a few horses that were walking around with their pasterns almost on the ground. He is not that bad--- I would never let him get to that point.

    He still runs around the pasture, He comes out of his stall after a rainy day full of himself kicking and bucking.

    I am wondering if there is ANYTHING I can do for him----- He is stiff and I'm worried about him. He has been my life for over 17 yrs.

    Anything for dropped pasterns??
     
  2. onmy87

    onmy87 Formerly QueenFluffBunny

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    Does he wear shoes? If so, I'd ask for the toe to be set back a bit to help with breakover. If he's barefoot, be sure the toe is kept tight and he doesn't go too long between trims. Anything to help ease breakover helps him.
     

  3. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Thanks!
    That is exactly the way he is trimmed. He is also left barefoot~

    I would love to be able to lift those pasterns but obviously there is no way to do it.
     
  4. onmy87

    onmy87 Formerly QueenFluffBunny

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    Have you had him checked for DSLD?
     
  5. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    What is that?
     
  6. paige

    paige New Member

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  7. syndiego

    syndiego New Member

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    Barb,

    I have two horses with dropped pasterns. My older gelding, Shadow, did not start until he was over 20. I think in his situation, it's age related. Years of being ridden and the affects of aging, his suspensories just do not have the elasticity they once had. Also, conformation is a factor. Horses with very straight hind limbs are more susceptible to problems.

    My mare, on the other hand, started having issues at about 12 years old, and is DSLD. DSLD (degenerative suspensory ligament desmitis) is a disorder, a defect in which the body is unable to produce collagen to repair tissue, and is most often seen first in the suspensory ligaments. The link that Paige posted has good information. I also belong to the DSLD yahoo group.

    In have both horses on a supplement regimen that Dr. Kellon has developed. It's a combination of the herb "jiaogulan" (which, incidently is also helpful to laminitic horses), and AAKG (can't recall what the acronym stands for - it's a nitrous oxide supplement). It has helped both my horses as far as their comfort level...both are pasture sound, and trot/canter without signs of any pain. Once in awhile if my mare gets too cranked up and overdoes it, her fetlocks will swell. At those times, I back off the AAKG, which is pro-inflammatory, and will massage with Sore-no-More and wrap.

    If you're interested in pursuing the treatment, I'd suggest you join the dsld group, and do some research.
     
  8. syndiego

    syndiego New Member

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    Here's a picture of my gelding's hind legs:

    [​IMG]



    And my mare:

    [​IMG]
     
  9. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    I would say Rocky is equivelent to your gelding---he has dropped significantly over the past 5 years but I do believe it is age related. He is 31 with arthritis in his knees also.

    I'm definitely going to look into the jaogulan for him