Odd pastern injury

Discussion in 'Ask The (wannabe) Vets & Farriers' started by syndiego, Oct 17, 2008.

  1. syndiego

    syndiego New Member

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    What do you think of this pastern?  This is a yearling filly, recently turned over to a rescue I am associated with, so no history on what may have happened, or how long it's been this way.  The vet is supposed to be out tomorrow, but I thought I'd post the picture here.

    The lump is hard, but doesn't encircle her entire pastern, mainly the front 2/3.  I don't know if you can see too well in the photo, but the front of her hoof wall is flakey and rough about one half way down.   She's comfortable moving, and when she's really motoring, seems sound. At other times, there's a definite hitch.

    [​IMG]

    Here's the link to her album on my photobucket account. 
    http://i184.photobucket.com/albums/x47/syndiego/Infinity/

    I hope this doesn't jeopardize her future as a riding mount, because she's a really nice girl,  good minded, sweet, nice conformation (IMO).  The photos don't show it well, but she's got a beautiful shoulder, and she's going to be big.    I'll post more after the vet has seen her.


    [edited - I don't know why all the &nbsp's in my post. I tried wiping them out]
     
  2. onmy87

    onmy87 Formerly QueenFluffBunny

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    I'm not sure I'd say with certainty this is an old injury. She very well could have been born that way.

    Wait to see what the vet says (and please do have radiographs taken)...but if this filly were in my possession it's doubtful she'd ever be ridden. The likeliness of arthritis and bone degeneration is high, plus she's probably putting a lot of weight on the tip of P3. I'd hazard a guess that as this filly gets older you will be battling to keep her pasture sound, not rideable.
     

  3. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    I have to agree that she will most likely never be ridable. This looks like a bith defect

    She will more then likely have a significant amount of arthritis in that leg----

    Please get xrays

    I would be very interested in hearing the outcome
     
  4. syndiego

    syndiego New Member

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    Vet x-rayed this morning, and it does appear to be a break of the pastern bone, but old, as in 6+months. If you saw these x-rays, and did not see the horse, you'd wonder how she was sound at all. P2 is actually out of line to the point that P1-P2-P3, instead of being a continuous line, looks like a "Z". There is a lot of bony calcification around the pastern bone, I liked the vet's analogy of the body throwing cement around it to stabilize it. He also said that the break was better here, than had it been in the coffin joint.

    He's going to show the x-rays to a surgeon down at UoI or Purdue, to see if there are any surgical options. But right now, she's clinically not that bad, and it may be smarter to just see how it goes. Incredibly, the joint has movement, and the break has stablized enough to the point that she moves without pain. He also flexed it pretty firmly, and no pain response. He did say it may fuse at some point, in which case her movement will be even more restricted. Right now, she has got to do more growing up, and being outside moving around seems to be helping, and get the proper nutrition.. (She was confined in a stall with a cement floor that hadn't been cleaned in who know how long). Poor thing has had a lot of crap thrown at her for her first few years, but she's a tough one.
     
  5. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    That sounds like one very lucky filly!

    Its hard to believe she has flexion in that ankle, was it a complete break of hairline according to the xrays? This is similar to the break of our Rambo's pastern bone---the body made a cast of swelling around it to secure the leg from snapping.

    If that is the case, she may benefit from surgery. As I stated one very lucky little girl~~ I hope the prognosis from the surgeon is good!

    Please keep us posted!
     
  6. syndiego

    syndiego New Member

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    There was so much remodelling of the bone, that it wasn't clear at this point exactly what type of break it was so many months later- at least that was my interpretation from the vet. The pastern joint itself looked pretty clean, so maybe that's why she has as much flexibility as she does. The sad thing is, had the @#$# owner treated it when it happened, perhaps a cast would have helped the alignment. QFB is correct, the way the bone set, it does look like a great amount of pressure on the coffin bone.

    Tell me about Rambo's break. I'm assuming if he was in your care, it was treated when it happened.
     
  7. onmy87

    onmy87 Formerly QueenFluffBunny

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    Were the rads digital?

    I'd love to take a gander at them...if they weren't digital, can you put them up in front of some light and take a pic and post them?
     
  8. syndiego

    syndiego New Member

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    They are digital, but I'm not the owner, I'm just a volunteer for the rescue. I'll ask her if she can send me a jpg, and if I can post them.
     
  9. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Rambo came to us with a very swollen, infected ankle with infection going up the leg to the hock. His break and future problems came as a result of human neglect---he was found tied out with nylon rope around his leg to confine him. The rope became imbedded and started chipping away at the pastern bone leaving multiple fragments. I wish we had the oppportunity to treat it immediately but that wasn't the case. He lived for quite some time with these conditions----- His feet were also involved, they were curled like the horns of a long horn sheep. April had tried to care for him while still at the premises he was impounded from------ Without her care I don't think he would still have that leg.

    His leg swelled and created a cast protecting it from snapping. The vets couldn't believe how the leg protected itself.
    Took 8 months to eliminate the infection, several operations and 4 yrs later we are still working on getting his hooves to the correct angles. The effected ankle is fused and round alot like this fillies. He still suffers from occasional infections that I have to openand drain--- pieces of the rope are still working their way out.

    He is a specail little guy and lets me work on him when needed.

    His ankle is locked, no movement ~