stifle strain and foot balance

Discussion in 'Ask The (wannabe) Vets & Farriers' started by JenR, Oct 21, 2008.

  1. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    What might be some of the ways one could alleviate stifle strain/aggravation with corrective trimming/shoeing? Or is this something that all the fancy footwork in the world would help?

    Interested in teh answer(s) as this is a topic that came up recently and I'd like to know.
     
  2. Cadence

    Cadence New Member

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    I don't know about the shoeing,trimming part of it, but i do know that with my gelding, we had to do A LOT of work strengthening those stifles! Staying away from circles helped also!
     

  3. RickB.

    RickB. New Member

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    First, there is no such thing as 'corrective trimming'. Or shoeing for that matter. There is only 'correct' and 'incorrect'.

    So the answer to your question is to have the feet trimmed correctly.

    The correct protocol, whether plain or fancy is what is needed. And what that protocol is, is subject to the concept of "It Depends".

     
  4. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    Rick, you're losing me here -- could you explain for a poor, nonfarrier lingoese sista just what exactly are the truisms of "there is no such thing as corrective trimming/shoeing only correct and incorrect" and "it depends". Please elaborate -- could ya give me like a hypothetical, for instance-y type description for illustrative purposes. Like for instance, in this sort of scenario, how might one trim the feet?

    Ok, maybe a couple of illustrative examples -- just to get a good picture here (pun not intended).
     
  5. RickB.

    RickB. New Member

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    First, let me say that there are many who disagree with my philosophy.

    That said, phrases are rather self explanatory. If a horse's feet are incorrectly trimmed, then one does not do "corrective trimming", one does "correct trimming" to return the feet to a proper state of health.

    In my truck, I carry a wide/diverse selection of horsehoes. Some are steel, some are aluminum, some are polyurethane. Some are glued on, some are nailed on, some can be both. I have or can fabricate, heart bar shoes, straight, bar shoes, egg bar shoes, etc, wedged heel shoes, banana shoes, etc.. Many look at my collection and opine "Wow! You sure carry a lot of corrective shoes in your truck" I reply that no, I don't carry any corrective shoes in my truck, rather, I carry shoes that are going to be correct for a specific situation.

    Which brings us to the concept of "It Depends". Everything we do with our horses is dependent on a set of circumstances or events in place at any given moment. Thus, for example, whether the horse remains shod or barefoot, depends. Whether the horse is fed a certain ration, depends. Whether the veterinarian is called or not, depends, etc.

    No two hooves are exactly alike and each hoof may or may not change during a trimming/shoeing cycle, so depending on the individual hoof in combination with other factors including, use, I apply the "It Depends" concept to how I approach the hoof care for that incividual hoof. And I do that each and every time I work on that hoof.

    I would try for as short a phalangeal lever as practical/pragmatic, not allow the heels to get tall, try to keep the frog in ground contact or close proximity to the ground, try to insure that the hoof was in A/P and M/L balance. Shoeing wise, (and here we go again :) ) it would depend on factors such as degree of injury,limb (and overall) conformation, what the management protocol was, and interaction with the attending veterinarian (assuming that is possible). I would not use a rim shoe, nor would I use a sliding plate. The toe of the shoe would more than likely be either rockered or rolled and heel extensions might also be employed. Again, It Depends. :)

    Hope that helps.



     
  6. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    Thanks Rick -- :-* Some interesting information there.
     
  7. desederada

    desederada New Member

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    Rick I have seen all the above shoes you mentioned but have never in my life heard of a "banana shoe". Do you happen to have a photo? The local shoeing shop here has a wall were the farriers can hang their funky homemade shoes. I always like to go and see what they have there.
     
  8. lori

    lori New Member

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    We tried out a banana shoe. Looks like the rocker bottom (don't think in horse terms here) of a rocking chair.

    Here's a thread on it:
    http://www.horseshoes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=2759

    ETA: Reading this thread makes me want to try it out again.... the farrier tacked it on, we lunged her, didn't like it and took it off.