EZ Entry Carts - Worth....?

Discussion in 'The Corral' started by Roherynn, Feb 21, 2009.

  1. Roherynn

    Roherynn New Member

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    I'm thinking about selling my mini/pony EZ entry cart; it has a padded seat and metal feet holder...thing :). It literally is new except for it has been sitting around in the barn for a while ready to drive.

    Anyone know of how much I could ask for it? I did a search and found a multitude of different prices for it, so I'm not really sure what would be fair to ask.
     
  2. MyTeDun

    MyTeDun Senior Member

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    Why don't you do an average of what you are finding online. I'm sure they are quite valuable to the right person.

    Check values at higher class publications also.
     

  3. HALL FARMS

    HALL FARMS Insert Title Here

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    I have a horse size EZ entry cart that I bought 3 years ago for $400 new.
     
  4. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    I'd figure around $400.
     
  5. Jen

    Jen New Member

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    I bought mine new for $400 last spring.
     
  6. Roherynn

    Roherynn New Member

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    Thanks for the help, guys! I found prices way higher than that (they probably had something special about them), but it helps to know what they were sold for new. ;)
     
  7. Susan

    Susan New Member

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    Are these carts a good value for the money? I know they are plain and simple, but are they sturdy? I have tossed around driving my gelding (his original owner said he drove him) and do not want to invest a huge amount into a cart unless I find that I really love to drive and will be road driving more than once in a while. I think I ahve also seen sleigh runners for these carts - or am I delusional? $400 for a new horse size cart is about what I have seen - never paid attention to the cost for mini.
     
  8. BUC

    BUC Administrator

    The last few sales at Morris there has been a guy bringing 2-3 brand new easy entry carts. He lets them go between $200-$250.
     
  9. STARSKI

    STARSKI New Member

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    Are there any local tack shops that sell driving equipment and carts?
     
  10. MelW

    MelW New Member

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    Hey, any one sees something like this let me know...My mom wants to learn to drive and i have verything she needs but a cart...
     
  11. arablvr31

    arablvr31 New Member

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    I'm not an expert by any means, but I have been driving my mare for about 9 months now, working with a trainer. I've spent some time learning about carts and such.

    Some of the EZ entry carts are well worth the money, some are a waste of money. It totally depends on construction and balance. A well made cart sould have the center of balance over the wheels. In other words, when you go to look at a cart, make sure you have a friend with you. Have one of you climb on to seat of the cart while the other person holds the shafts level to the ground. The cart should not tilt back (shafts up) or put all the weight in the shafts once you sit down (everything shifts a bit while you are climing in). Either condition can make for a dangerous situation for the horse. The bigger issue is the whole cart tipping back. For very small equines (minis, small pony's) there can be enough of a lever to almost lift the horse off the ground. For larger horses, it's also dangerous because the shafts bounce a lot and can cause soreness. It can be hard to hold the shafts down. Too much weight in the shafts can cause an ill fitting harness to cause sores, or just plain irritate the horse.

    Personally, I don't like metal shafts, but that's a personal opinion. It's hard to attach the breeching to metal shafts when the footman's loops are in the wrong place. Placement of the breeching wrap straps is very important because the breeching is your brakes. If it's too tight, the horse feels confined (and some horses kick). If it's too loose, the cart can come up an hit the horse in the hocks (also dangerous). Also, an inexperienced horse can bend and twist the shafts if there are any issues, possibly ruining the cart all together. Wood shafts give more, and tend to return to their original shape. If broken, wooden shafts, while more expensive, are easier to replace.

    I lucked out and found an old (1938) Jerald show cart for training. The cart isn't in show shape, but it's in really really good shape for it's age. With a little work I could get it in show shape. I also have a Road Cart for showing. The road cart is in the middle of being refinished so I can use it for showing in Carriage shows this summer. I don't have pictures of my training cart, but I'll post one of my show cart, before we started refinishing it. In these pictures, the cart is a little too far back from the horse. This was the first time my horse was attached to it, and I adjusted the footman's loops right after this drive (moved them back), so the shafts end right at the point of the shoulder. My trainer is doing the driving.

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