I'm going to kill my horse

Discussion in 'The Carrot Stick' started by poodlelover, Mar 3, 2009.

  1. poodlelover

    poodlelover Moderator

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    and sell her for dog food.

    The other day she ran off from the mounting block in the indoor and flew down to the other end of the arena. Twice. I finally got on - she stood like a statue as is expected but I was pissed.

    Today I tack up, walk down to the arena, shut the doors (thankfully) and turn on the lights. I turn to walk her to the mounting block and she rips the reins out of my hands and takes off. Gallops to the other end of the arena with bucking involved. Then took off galloping all over the freaking arena (we were the only ones in there). Broke my favorite reins - the bitch. I catch her, calm her down and leave to go back to the barn for a different set of reins. While in the barn I put the halter on over her bridle and used a lead rope to take her back to the indoor. As soon as I get in there she rips the lead rope out of my hands and takes off. Same scenario - except this time I didn't have the reins on her so she didn't break a second set.

    She has been a model citizen for months now. I have no idea what is going on in that little pea brain but I am NOT happy!!!
     
  2. paige

    paige New Member

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    Time of year.

    Days like that you should go home and snuggle up with a bottle.
     

  3. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    I agree. They get squirly this time of year.
    Do you use the indoor for turnout?
    Is it a bad habit she's developed thinking indoor means freedom to run/play?

    Maybe try lunging her first before riding?
     
  4. poodlelover

    poodlelover Moderator

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    I have let her run around in the indoor this winter when the weather restricted their play time during turnout.

    Tomorrow I'm going out at a time I think there won't be anybody in the indoor and I'm going to lunge her before riding. Part of the problem is she's so big and so strong that if she's acting up like that I'm waaay to scared to get on her. Hope she hasn't figured that out!!
     
  5. lori

    lori New Member

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    I guess it's bad to chuckle, huh? What a little hooker breath pony. I would get great satisfaction in working her ass off on the ground. Thank goodness you weren't leading her out in the open to get on her.
     
  6. AKPonygirl

    AKPonygirl New Member

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    oh hell yeah.. when Mischief gets Spring Spunk.. we do TONS of groundwork and maybe ride once at the end of the week.. I am allergic to hitting the ground...
     
  7. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    ANd now that she's done this successfully twice, I'd be using a lunge line to lead her and putting a chain over her nose, giving it a sharp tug at the door, open it a bit, back her ass up, walk forward a bit and tug again. Really get her attention before ever going through the door. If she tries to blow by, you at least have some legnth to feed out while not letting her get completely away.
    If she does it, try to go with her and back, back, back agressivily! If you can manage it, back her in a circle back around and head her backing out the door!
    She's got to learn that she must wait and not anticipate blowing forward and getting away.

    Bad pony!
     
  8. Tbitt

    Tbitt Most beloved member of MW

    This is great advice EquuesT!!!!
     
  9. poodlelover

    poodlelover Moderator

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    Thanks ET. I'm heading out there in a bit and taking your excellent advice. I was also told by one of my trainer friends to put the lunge line through a d-ring on the saddle and then attach to the bit. What do you think about that? I don't want to A)do anything wrong or B) wreck my saddle.
     
  10. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    Um.... I'd not do that as I don't think it will assist you in controlling her.
    That can be a very effective lunging technique IF you know how to manipulate their body but not for basic inhand control.
    just my .02 though.
     
  11. whoaboy

    whoaboy Senior Member

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    Well what do you know! I fully expected to see some reply about the horse being in some kind of pain as the reason for the antics! So glad you won't be calling the vet! The girl is full of piss and vinegar as the expression goes or I suppose some say, "feeling her oats" !
     
  12. lori

    lori New Member

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    OMG! I hope no one is feeding their horse straight oats!!!


    LOL--JUST KIDDING!

     
  13. poodlelover

    poodlelover Moderator

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    Well, horse was apparently on crack yesterday and on valium today. I borrowed a nose chain and headed off with my lunge line. She was a model of propriety, lunged in both directions. Stood like a statue at the mounting block while I rubbed all over her back, etc. Then when we were alone I took the lead rope off and let her loose. She followed me around and looked out the window.

    Go figure. Moody bitch.
     
  14. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    LOL!
    glad things went better today Poods!
     
  15. miss_santana

    miss_santana New Member

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    lol Must have been something in the air the other day! I went to lunge my boy, he copped a 'tude and got corrected, then went from 0 to 60 and dragged the lunge line out of my hand. I hadn't closed the gate of the arena because I hadn't anticipated any of that (it's a part of the pasture, luckily), so he went galloping away through the pasture, screaming his head off for his buddy and acting like he wanted to go through the fence.

    I was following him thinking "REALLY?!" and coaxing him to come to me with some choice words. He was out of his head, though, then suddenly snapped out of it and walked right up to me. He got the chain over his nose (suddenly remembered his manners) and worked until he was good and sweaty, then he spent 1/2 an hour tied to a tree outside thinking about how he didn't need to be a buddy sour shithead.

    Usually I use the least amount of "muscle" necessary until a horse proves they need it, but this time of year I'm reminded that sometimes it's better to head off any attempts at revolutions before they start with something as simple as a chain over the nose, etc.
     
  16. gaitriders

    gaitriders New Member

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    Ah yes spring is in the air and these wonderful horses are full of it. With the the horse that wanted to rurn through the door, I'd be really carefull with the chain over the nose. That could cause a great deal of damage by a sudden pull on the line. Or if he has to much slack in the line and gets tangeled up in it, you have one hell of a wreck on your hands. And I would never run the line through your saddle and attach it to the bit to take him in the arena with him wanting to take off. If he gets away from you, he now has the line attached to the bit and running around. Think of all the damage he could do to his mouth. First get him in the arena and then start working him. Once he is calmed down then I wouldn't be afraid to ground drive him with lines through the saddle. I do that all the time while training horses. To get him through the door, I would put a stud chain on him under his chin. Slowly start to open the door and pay close attention to him, if starts to get in a hurry to go tug on the chain a little and back him up and tell him whoa. Work him in that manner and I think you will have great sucess. Be carefull and have a safe horse season. Happy trails!!
     
  17. ThreeBarB

    ThreeBarB New Member

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    ha ha
    i rode my friends horse last week and it was like riding a coiled spring.
    thought i was going to be a lawn dart, but he didn't let fly...this time
    Glad to know I'm not alone!