Lower leg injury

Discussion in 'Ask The (wannabe) Vets & Farriers' started by Tbitt, Feb 25, 2009.

  1. Tbitt

    Tbitt Most beloved member of MW

    I have a friend, who's older gelding, has a swollen lower leg from a slip in the pasture.

    He must have landed on something because he has a nicely swollen leg.



    I told her the only thing I have ever done for my guys with injuries is cold hose them.

    I admit, Rex is the only guy to have multiple owies and I had the vet look at them all...............Disclaimer: I did have flint on the property when he gashed up his leg bad. I did the same thing - cold hosed him until the Vet got there.


    So, what do you guys recommend with a swollen leg?
     
  2. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    Do you know if there is any heat in the leg?
    Any open wounds or cuts?
    Cold hose is good.

    If there is heat, I like to poultice.

    If no heat, maybe a leg sweat.

    If the horse sore on it at all?
     

  3. Tbitt

    Tbitt Most beloved member of MW

    No, no heat and no open wounds.............

    What is a leg sweat?


    (Remember I've only been into horses for 4-5 years ::) )
     
  4. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    Ok..no problem. Its really very easy.

    First, have you ever warpped a leg? If not, can someone help you?

    A leg sweat can a mixture of different saves or ointments. I prefer furacin mixed with DMSO. You can use either the suave or liquid furacin. Mix it with DMSO. Rub all over swollen leg, you can use a moderate amount.
    Then wrap with a cotton wrap or quilt. Over that you use plastic wrap, (saran wrap). Wrap that over your cotton bandage or quilt.
    Then use stall bandage over that.
    Leave on overnight.
    Next day, take off all bandages and plastic wrap. You should see a difference in the "size" of the leg. You may need to do again for another 1-2 days.

    If there is no difference after 1-2 "sweats" call vet.

    But, I would only do this if
    1-you have knowledge in wrapping a leg. If you dont, I dont want you to cord the leg from improper bandaging.
    2-If the horse is not lame and or heat in the injured area.

    Oh and keep colding hosing!

    Not trying to knock you knowledge, just dont know how much you know or don't know.

    Hope this helps! Keep us posted.
     
  5. Imzadi

    Imzadi New Member

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    Put a thin layer of DMSO over the swollen area, then a layer of poultice, then a wet newspaper/or shop towel, then put saran wrap around the entire area, then wrap with a quilt and standing wrap. The wrap needs to be changed EVERY day, and I only use DMSO for 3-4 days at a time. This will help to sweat out inflamation. He is sound on the leg? Remember if it is infection, that the swelling usually starts to work it's way up. Only wrap if you have been shown the proper way....very important!
     
  6. Tbitt

    Tbitt Most beloved member of MW

    Oh, No - I'm not taking it as a knock at all.

    This info is good, and great for anyone else who might read it!

    Wrpping legs - One of my friends, who has since moved away, told me some lovely stories about bad wrap jobs on their race horses. :'(
     
  7. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    I dont disagree with your process, but there have been many a discussion over my years as to keep poultice "wet" or "let it dry".

    By wrapping the wet paper with plastic, it keeps the poultice wet. Some believe that keeping the poultice wet, won't let the poultice work.

    Now, if you wrap just with the wet paper, it lets the poultice dry-which some say is the only way the poultice work. As it drys, it pulls the heat out.

    For me personally, I use the wet paper on top of poultice, then bandage.

    Or, just poultice, no bandage.

    Everybody has their own way, you have to see what works best for you.
     
  8. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    Sweat wrap uses plastic.
    Poulticing does not.
    *by adding a layer of wet paper it prolongs the drying time of the poultice giving it longer drawing time.
    * adding a layer of plastic over a poultice defeats the purpose.
     
  9. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    I can't tell you how many "poultice" debates there have been at the track over the years.

    I know that when I worked for other trainers, the "good" ones would never use plastic with their poultice.
    Only the wet paper.

    Plus, as many legs as I have poulticed over the years, I have seen that using the wet paper works the best.
     
  10. Joie

    Joie New Member

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    I've never used plastic with a POULTICE, but with a sweat, definately.

    I would also cold hose, or ice. I had an ice boot, which I liked so I could put the boot on in the AM and PM while doing chores, and not have to spend time standing there hosing. I believe PT has it...maybe she'd be willing to part with it for awhile so someone else can use it.
     
  11. Imzadi

    Imzadi New Member

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    I used to work as a vet tech for a lameness specialist, and this is what she always had the clients do. We have used it for years on my farm, and believe that it works.... the thought being that the plastic wrap keeps it working longer. The only thing that I can tell you is that is we have had a swollen leg in the past, treated it as I suggested, and if someone happened to skipped a day....we have seen a difference. I started using this method many years ago when an older gelding of mine strained his hind digital flexor tendon, and it worked beautifully. Anyway, just a suggestion!
     
  12. monizzle

    monizzle New Member

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    Hobble I'm not disagreeing with your process but I was taught in this sequence:
    1. Sweat material
    2. Plastic wrap
    3. Cotton wrap

    Just did a quick search and looks like your technique may be used to prevent any sores developing from applying plastic wrap closer to the leg-of course now I can't find that article. What has been your experience?
     
  13. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    Call me blonde, but experience with plastic directly on the leg or my overall experience with horses? I guess I didnt undestand your question.

    As far as the plastic wrap goes, on the leg or on the quilt.
    The plastic can be a number of problems if put directly on the leg, starting with cording of the leg. I have seen it done this way, and within an hour the plastic had slipped down and was no longer creating a sweat, and possible cording of the leg.
    I don't think that the plastic directly on the leg would cause any sores, unless you are using something that could "blister".

    Now, I will say, that when sweating a hock or a knee, then YES the plastic is directly on the hair.
    Usually, when sweating one of those, wrap the plastic on the knee or hock and bringing down the plastic to where the bandage can hold the plastic in place (most of the time). Hocks are the worst-by morning the plastic is usually ripped....but you can tell that the "sweat" has worked cause usually you can feel it on the plastic and sometimes it has been absorbed into the top of the bandage.



    I am no expert, by any means. I like to help people, that's why I post to some of the things on here.
    And I figure that since I work with these kinds on things on a daily basis, I could pass some of that along. :)
     
  14. lori

    lori New Member

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    I was both sweating and poulticing hocks -- not at the same time.
    Sweat was DMSO+cortisone, then saran wrap, then pillow wrap, then stretchy polo wrap
    Poultice was ... Super H? thick white stuff, then saran wrap, then pillow wrap, then stretchy polo wrap

    I was gonna say... lucky to come the next AM and have it all perfectly in place. ::) I did buy a hock sweat and then it was sweat or poultice, saran wrap, then hock sweat. It was all about the same. The hock sweat meant less of a juggling act. The vet didn't mention the hock sweat but the pillow wrap and wrapping a hock was torture.

    I would like to thank my horses, my bf's horses, and his dad's horses for making sure I have experienced practically every ailment and treatmnet under the sun...
     
  15. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    It's hard to visulize alot of stuff we have to deal with on an internet forum.

    When sweating a hock, I the only thing I wrapped the hock in was the plastic. I would usually start on the leg ,with leg quilted, work my way up and around the hock, then down a little. Tear the plastic off, then finish wrapping with stall bandage (or polo). It would be so much easier if I we could just see it!! LOL

    I tried hock sweat one time..I hated it.

    The great poultice debate! I love it!

    Now, I will say, that if I have poulticed feet, I do use either plastic wrap or a feed bag with the plastic lining in it still, to poultice feet. That is about the only time I have used "plastic" when using poultice. I forget about that earlier. I havent poulticed a foot in a while. lol!
     
  16. lori

    lori New Member

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    Hmmm.. poulticing feet... What would that be used to treat? Would you poultice the hoof? The sole?

    See, I would like to know more about these little "helper" tricks, when you're not necessarily treating a significant injury, just babying...
     
  17. monizzle

    monizzle New Member

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    "Call me blonde, but experience with plastic directly on the leg or my overall experience with horses?"

    I'm not second guessing your horse experience, I've seen enough of your posts to know that you know what you are talking about. I am not trying to argue, am truly curious from an educational interest. I appreciate your daily experience with these things and if you have a found a better way I would like to put it in my repertoire for future use.

    I think that the article was saying if it went sweat, plastic, cotton wrap the plastic could potentially hold in enough heat to cause the sweat to blister the leg. But the article also said that sweat, cotton wrap, plastic was not sufficient and would allow for too much cooling before it had time to work-So maybe this guy was just a quack ;). Again in my experience I have never had the plastic cause cording or blistering nor had it slip down if the wrap is at the cannon, but my need for sweating has been VERY limited.

    I think it's good to have educational "debates" because you can always walk away with more knowledge.
     
  18. hobblehanger

    hobblehanger New Member

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    oh no....I just didn't understand the question? Its hard to sometimes "understand" things on a forum. You are talking to someone but can't hear how you are talking to each other, that's all. I didn't think you were trying to argue...I am blonde, I don't always "get it"! ;)

    We poultice feet to help take the "sting" out. Or a horse that tends to have sore feet, or "bad" feet.

    modified to add
    The surface that we race on can be very hard at times. We can use the poultice as a pre-race treatment to help their feet feel better or post-race to help take the heat out. Their feet get very hot after they race. If we don't use poultice, we pack them with mud and paint them with grease.


    Basically you put poultice all over the foot, sole, quarters, front of hoof up to the coronet band.
    I get an empty feed bag. Cut the end of the bag that is still closed. Cut about 8in or so up from the stitching of the bag, cut clear across. Then cut the bag in half (vertical) so you have two parts. By this time your parts should have two sides of openings and two closed.

    Have all of your supplies ready and bags cut before you poultice! I have made this mistake many times, and get pissed cause I poultice and then realize I didn't cut my bag, or its at the other end of the barn.....like I said, I am blonde!! ;)

    Once foot is covered in poultice, take bag and put the horses foot in the opening, put the toe right in the corner of the bag. Bring bag up and around foot. I then use either vetwrap or duct tape to tape the bag on. Do this around toe and foot, around back and under foot. If using tape, don't go around the coronet band to tight. N
    Now, like I said previous, I have used plastic wrap instead of a bag. Then taped...but I like the feed sack better. Better chance of it staying on the foot over night.

    If I can remember, I will take some photos tomorrow. I will have one of the grooms do some feet and take some pictures.
    I just have to figure out how to get them on here. (every time I try it wont let me paste them on here).

    I have seen people use poultice for abscesses, or quarter cracks, but I don't think they help with those issues.
     
  19. Shell

    Shell New Member

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    I wish all of you could get together and put on a seminar about the things you know :) For some of us, it would be learning something new, or others maybe learning a few new tricks.
    After reading all this so far, it's sounding like owning horses is complicated. Only because I haven't had to deal with this yet and haven't experienced anyone having doing this before so I can watch and learn something.
     
  20. Tbitt

    Tbitt Most beloved member of MW

    I'm with you Shell!


    And I think we need a "class" on braiding! (I've said that many times! :p)