Morgan Hunters

Discussion in 'The Corral' started by desederada, Jan 17, 2009.

  1. desederada

    desederada New Member

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    O.K. Morgan people explain this to me.I'm watching these Morgan hunter videos and to me it looks to be a cross between saddleseat and hunters especially at the trot. The rider are posting from a behind the motion in a chair seat.Very different from what would be seen at an open Hunter show. Explain the difference in say HUS and Hunter Pleasure and what they are looking for and which these classes would be. Here are two videos I found. I had a really good one but Youtube removed it.

    www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKmyQIY-jNc

    http://www.dragonfiremorgans.com/video/kirinvideo.htm
     
  2. desederada

    desederada New Member

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    I wanted to add that I thank that last one of the stallion is a lovely horse and he looks like he'd be awesome to ride ;D Lots more action that a traditional hunter.
     

  3. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    It's a breed show -- you aren't necessarily going to get a majority of horses that are traditional hunters, nor will their riders be. Not to say that there aren't some out there that could do the open (traditional) hunters, but there will be horses and riders out at any breed show whose specialty will not be actual open huntery type stuff.
     
  4. TwistedWire

    TwistedWire Guest

    And people say QH's don't look huntery. :D

    Purdy, yes, but that's not my definition of hunter. Course, neither are arabs. Not that I don't like either breed-they just don't exactly fit the job description.
     
  5. Ponythief

    Ponythief New Member

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    I hate dial-up :mad: But couldn't tell ya anyhow as I don't do the fancy show stuff ;D
     
  6. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    See, I don't think some of the AQ and Paint horses are all that "hunter-y" -- they're just "un-hunter-y" in a different, but equal, way. Just like the Morgans and Arabs, there are some QHs and Paints that could do the open, traditional hunter shows but not all. Same goes for their riders.

    Once again, the explanation is -- it's a breed show, not a discipline show.

    *Edited to add:

    A lot of it comes down to training (both horse and rider) -- train a Morgan or an Arab as an actual hunter, train their riders first and foremost as hunter riders, ride them that way, and you get a hunter type horse (true definition, see following paragraph; I think the show animals have to be of a certain type, which a nonTB/TB cross horse might not fit; the actual is far more inclusive); same with the QHs and Paints, or any other breed for that matter. The thing of it is, that isn't the case, and thus you see discrepancies. The judges, some of them not being trained to judge actual hunters, rather their breed, allow some latitude, and there you have it.

    And to be perfectly frank, what goes on in today's open (traditional) hunter shows I'm not sure could really be called "hunter" -- as in the traditional definition of horse and riders capable of following the hunt. Somehow I really can't see some of the show hunters (and their riders) really being up to an all day hunt, I can't really see them keeping up well, or with style, with the field (which as stated above is pretty inclusive -- not so "type" specific at all, as long as the bugger does his job). Now, I'm sure there are some that could (and maybe do) -- just like the breed show horses and riders -- but not all I think. So maybe something needs to be done about that as well.
     
  7. desederada

    desederada New Member

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    Well I think stock horse hunters and Morgan hunters are like Yin Yang. Total opposites, but the Morgan hunter sure looks much more fun to ride.
     
  8. desederada

    desederada New Member

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    But if you take a Morgan and ride/train them as you would a traditional hunter they are excellant hunters. A Morgan would more than fill the job description and you would actually be able to do fox hunt with him. Not sure I could say the same of some of the stock hunters.
     
  9. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    It would depend upon the particular bloodlines and the individual horse -- I've met and sat on some really nice stock horse bred hunters (both show and field), but what each had in common (especially the field hunters) was that they weren't the best show types.

    Conversely, some Morgans aren't the greatest -- again, bloodlines and the individual. The old Government bred horses do pretty well, but the ones from successful park lines aren't ideal. Same with the Arabs; I wouldn't want to try out the majority of halter bred horses (there are a few exceptions) in the hunt field, but some of the Polish, Russian, and CMK horses are pretty darn nice.
     
  10. burgie

    burgie New Member

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    Call me crazy, but I couldn't get past the ridiculously long tail extensions.
    I couldn't focus on anything else....
    obnoxious
     
  11. BUC

    BUC Administrator

    Awww...BoBo would be sad to hear you say that. I quit wrapping his tail in the winter becuause it got 15' long. It still has to be trimmed so he doesn't step on it :)
     
  12. burgie

    burgie New Member

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    Well damn it.
    Those are real?
     
  13. BUC

    BUC Administrator

    I bet they are :) You should see the tails on some of the show Arabs. Amazing! If I had my own barn slave Bo would have one of those beauties...but *sigh* I just don't want to do the upkeep.
     
  14. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    Morgans are kinda famous for their long, thick, and flowing locks.

    I think BoBo needs to grow Chester a tail wig ;D

    The Andalusians and Friesians are also marvels of equine hairdressery; I'll take the pulled short manes and banged tails any day, that's enough work as it is.
     
  15. burgie

    burgie New Member

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    See...now I thought they looked long, but rather wispy.
    The friesian we have at our farm has a super thick, wavy tail - but it is not nearly that long. It also isn't wrapped up, though...
     
  16. BUC

    BUC Administrator

    What I've seen out of horses with the overly long tails is you do lose thickness with length. I'm assuming partly because they are brushed and groomed so often. Plus they would even be more of a nightmare if they were real thick. Bo's is super thick, but with it just dragging the ground, getting a chop from scissors and only being brushed 2x a year when I actually ride him :-[ I'm sure that's why his has stayed that way.
     
  17. burgie

    burgie New Member

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    hell...is it too much to ask for length and thickness? :-*
     
  18. Ponythief

    Ponythief New Member

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    gasp.............
    stick a knife in me..... ;D ;)
     
  19. JenR

    JenR Formerly Underworld Queen

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    I'm going to Hell, right? :)

    Then there are some horses who just don't seem to have much in the way of a tail, aka. Chester and Zippy. Brushing it does cause hair loss (I've got some similar opinions on silicon based "slicker" sprays too, but maybe that's just being weird), that's why Jessica and Adrienne hand pick(ed) their ponies' scanty locks 99.9% of the time -- and they still could do with a tail wig.
     
  20. desederada

    desederada New Member

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    My horse has the thickest freakin tail. I don't comb and brush it on occasion I'll finger comb it. He has been know to step on it though if I don't keep it short enough and has removed as much as another horses tail from his and still had alot. I've found the key to keeping it nice is to keep it a couple inches above his ankles since I don't bag it. I think those REALLY long tail are ridiculous if you plan on doing any real riding.