Stonewall Sporthorse??

Discussion in 'The Foaling Stall' started by equusteacher, Dec 2, 2011.

  1. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    So, met someone thru someone on Fb. ::)
    They have a 1/2 Stonewall Sporthorse / 1/2 Fresian.

    So I had to ask (politely) WTF (ok, I phrased it differently), is a Stonewall Sporthorse.
    her explination was: ... they are basically half appaloosa / half percheron horses. Originally bred by Mike Muir for driving and being sane + splashy and colorful horses.
    Sugarbush Draft has some of the Stonewalls as well.
    This is the website she directed me to; http://www.sugarbushdrafthorse.com/History.html

    Go ahead....
    Discuss. ;D
     
  2. Joie

    Joie New Member

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    Speechless.

    Really, I think I am going to start a new "breed". Something founded completely on color and two breeds totally unlike in conformation. I'll pick the most poorly conformed of each breed, and hope for the best.
     

  3. AreYouSirius

    AreYouSirius New Member

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    Well that's intriguing... I do like a good portion of the Appy Sprothorses I've seen (App x Warmbloods ... usually Holsteiner or Oldenburg), but I've never really seen the glory in the draft x stock horse cross. Personally, I think they do better on their own...
     
  4. Powdernsmoke

    Powdernsmoke Active Member

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    This is exactly what I want someday, but I want it for ME. I will only breed one, and I will keep it for it's entire life. I will not go breeding them willy nilly and calling it a new breed. And the prices they are asking for what is basically a mutt? I can't believe people will pay these prices.
     
  5. Brenda

    Brenda New Member

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    You probably won't even have to breed your own "someday" because there will be plenty of yearlings for sale cheap that need you.
     
  6. Powdernsmoke

    Powdernsmoke Active Member

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    And that is just sad. I can't imagine anyone else in the world that would want a big horse with huge stocky legs, a big old workhorse head, and Appy spots and attitude. Why on EARTH would anyone purposely breed them?
     
  7. Brenda

    Brenda New Member

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    I can imagine why someone would WANT one like that, but not why they would purposely BREED one...
    Aren't there a lot of PMU foals being raised for slaughter that are from big parents?
     
  8. Chewbacca

    Chewbacca New Member

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    Anyone ever hear of the "breed" Georgian Grande.?

    What people are doing with horses is getting just as bad as "designer dogs".

    I'm still waiting on the miniature/belgian cross, personally.
     
  9. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    The GG does not bother me nearly as much as this cross.
    Saddlebreds have a similar build as the fresian in that they both have necks that tie in high, tall shoulders, short croups, swing from the shoulder and have a lot of knee action. So you get a sturdier saddlebred with a calmer mind and fancy hair ;)
    I do not see the point in crossing a stock breed with a drafty breed as their movements are so completely different.
    Then again, for a long while I wanted a GG LOL! ::) :laugh:
    http://www.georgiangrande.com/
     
  10. Joie

    Joie New Member

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    My problem with the Georgian Grande is this:

    Foundation Stock Registration
    In order to register a Stallion or Mare as Georgian Grande foundation breeding stock, the bloodlines must be a blend of the saddlebred with Friesian, Clydesdale, Shire, Percheron, or Belgian, or Irish Draught; Registered Drum Horses and Gypsy Vanners ("aka" Gypsy horses") are acceptable provided they are registered within their own breed and have proof of pedigree. Spotted Draft horses must be registered with a spotted draft horse registry and must have a pedigree background of registered Friesian, Percheron, Clydesdale, Shire, or Belgian breeding. Proof of pedigree required.


    You can pretty much register ANYTHING as a Georgian Grande as long as it is 25%+ Saddlebred and part whatever you see above. There is a standard for conformation/type, but no inspections or anything to verify those standards.

    I think if you are going to "create" a "breed", you absolutely must cull, cull, cull and that takes generations and generations of careful breeding.
     
  11. equusteacher

    equusteacher New Member

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    Joie, I agree.
    I am NOT saying that this is a good idea.
    But, my point was merely, this is somewhat better than breeding a Friesian with an Appaloosa.

    And, I always thought it was a SB/Friesian cross only (that's all it was years ago when I ear marked this "breed" anyway). I didn't know it was open to any and ALL draft breeds. ::)
    It's been years since I even looked at this site and merely copy/pasted the web addy.
    My bad. :-
     
  12. Chewbacca

    Chewbacca New Member

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    My problem with the Georgian Grande is as follows:

    1) Who came up with the name? I mean, really??? How do you get that name?

    2) It's 1/2 saddlebred

    3) It's 1/2 Friesian, or draft, or any other of the myriad of breeds Joie listed (which I didn't know, either.)

    :D
     
  13. AreYouSirius

    AreYouSirius New Member

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    OK I lied... This little guy is frickin adorable, and he happens to be 1/2 Appy and 1/2 Irish Draght.

    [​IMG]

    So, I suppose there is a chance that I would like a Draft/Stock horse...
     
  14. salukifan2

    salukifan2 New Member

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  15. Joie

    Joie New Member

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    An Irish Draught is NOTHING like a "regular" draft, such as a Belgian. Totally different conformation and bred for a purpose as a performance horse, not just for something big and colorful.

    Knabstruppers, too, are not a "draft" breed, per se. They, too, have been purpose bred for generations, using the Dutch Warmbloods and trakehners as "outcross" breeds to perfect the breed and hold true to a standard, aside from color.

    I am sure that sometimes a draft/appy cross may be successful, but why chance it? Breeding is enough of a risk with long proven bloodlines.
     
  16. LuvMyArabs

    LuvMyArabs New Member

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    My opinion... BLECKK!! LOL
     
  17. onmy87

    onmy87 Formerly QueenFluffBunny

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    Weellll, ya hope! Or you get a multicolored something that looks like a squashed draft with a exhuberance of a SB who doesn't realize how much mass they have.
     
  18. Joie

    Joie New Member

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    LOL! Exactly! And you may not even get the multicolored part!
     
  19. HossDriver

    HossDriver New Member

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    I remember following Mike Muir's cross-country drive with a team of four Stonewall mares in the mid-90s. This was through the Carriage Driving list. He had a lot of difficulties with lameness and keeping shoes on, but that was to be expected because he was on asphalt for the most part.

    Those four mares were lookers. Loud b/w leopard spots with black legs. Basically they looked like hitch Percherons with Appy color. I remember drooling over the pictures.

    I would hazard a guess and say that it's the color combined with size that people buy, not necessarily anything else. I say this because one of the most popular horses (amongst drivers) when I was still driving was a Belgian/Appy cross. Had the weirdest shuffle-step, average head, sorrel in color, big body and a blanket on her rump. Everyone thought she was just so pretty and the bee's knees. Yet anyone with a lick of conformation knowledge would say she was average and she moved funny.
     
  20. photofinish

    photofinish Senior Member

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    My Mom's mare was an honest to God OOPS. Her mom was a registered QH and her dad was a Belgian the breeder found in his pasture the morning he went to get the mare to breed to his registered QH :eek:. Mom wanted a drafty horse, breeder wanted her gone, we got her cheap, and Mom loved the useless old bitch. BUT, she looked like a short (15.1 ish), fat, heavy necked, slightly swaybacked, Belgian. She was about as athletic as a tree trunk. BUT, she was eligible for American Warmblood... >:D... Lets face it, breeding within a breed can be capracious, anyone with the patience and temerity to truly cull and cross match, and create a Good crossbred has my respect. Unfortunately it seems like most crossbreeders just want pretty colors or something that sounds cool :-